Tuesday, 7 September 2010

Gallowglass musketeer

At least that's what I think it is - thanks to Uwe for sending it in - it's from the Dublin museum.

4 comments:

clibinarium said...

More likely to be a Kern (Ceithern in Irish); lighter armed soldier who fought in support of Gallowglass (who would usually have 2 or three Kern as their attendants).
His helmet and firearm suggest he is probably from the 1590s when Kern were increasingly well armed by the O'Neills and other lords.

Le Loup said...

Strange, does not seem very well protected for 1594, very scant clothing.

Macanmarcach said...

I agree the clothing lacks protection but the long Irish shirt or léine is well attested to. It was gathered up around the waist with a belt when moving fast, but this one looks very large indeed. Kern described as a `flying enemy' in one English source were traditionally light harrying troops who threw darts or spears and eventually moved on to firearms. They had a reputation (true or not) among the English for ruthlessness towards defeated enemies.

Anonymous said...

That's because this is totally wrong. Caliver and cabasett is all they got right. Irish shot work short jackets and trews. Armed with a sword or large knife, sometime also carries a small target. Wore brogues on his feet. Lord Mountjoy described Tyrone's as the finest he'd ever seen and had little to learn from service in Europe.This on the other hand is not.